Die casting is a metal casting process that is characterized by forcing molten metal under high pressure into a mold cavity. The mold cavity is created using two hardened tool steel dies which have been machined into shape.Most die castings are made from non-ferrous metals, specifically zinc, copper, aluminium, magnesium, lead, pewter and tin-based alloys.The casting equipment and the metal dies represent large capital costs and this tends to limit the process to high-volume production. Manufacture of parts using die casting is relatively simple, involving only four main steps, which keeps the incremental cost per item low. It is especially suited for a large quantity of small- to medium-sized castings, which is why die casting produces more castings than any other casting process. Die castings are characterized by a very good surface finish (by casting standards) and dimensional consistency.

The following are the four steps in traditional die casting, also known as high-pressure die castingthese are also the basis for any of the die casting variations: die preparation, filling, ejection, and shakeout. The dies are prepared by spraying the mold cavity with lubricant. The lubricant both helps control the temperature of the die and it also assists in the removal of the casting. The dies are then closed and molten metal is injected into the dies under high pressure; between 10 and 175 megapascals (1,500 and 25,400 psi). Once the mold cavity is filled, the pressure is maintained until the casting solidifies. The dies are then opened and the shot (shots are different from castings because there can be multiple cavities in a die, yielding multiple castings per shot) is ejected by the ejector pins. Finally, the shakeout involves separating the scrap, which includes the gate, runners, sprues and flash, from the shot. This is often done using a special trim die in a power press or hydraulic press. Other methods of shaking out include sawing and grinding. A less labor-intensive method is to tumble shots if gates are thin and easily broken; separation of gates from finished parts must follow. This scrap is recycled by remelting it.The yield is approximately 67%.

Advantages of die casting:

  • Excellent dimensional accuracy (dependent on casting material, but typically 0.1 mm for the first 2.5 cm (0.005 inch for the first inch) and 0.02 mm for each additional centimeter (0.002 inch for each additional inch).
  • Smooth cast surfaces (Ra 1–2.5 micrometres or 0.04–0.10 thou rms).
  • Thinner walls can be cast as compared to sand and permanent mold casting (approximately 0.75 mm or 0.030 in).
  • Inserts can be cast-in (such as threaded inserts, heating elements, and high strength bearing surfaces).
  • Reduces or eliminates secondary machining operations.
  • Rapid production rates.
  • Casting tensile strength as high as 415 megapascals (60 ksi).
  • Casting of low fluidity metals.

Disadvantage to die casting:

  • Very high capital cost. Both the casting equipment required and the dies and related components are very costly, as compared to most other casting processes.
  • To make die casting an economic process, a large production volume is needed.
  • The process is limited to high-fluidity metals, and casting weights must be between 30 grams (1 oz) and 10 kg (20 lb)
  • It is only for parts in which softness is acceptable,parts needing hardening (through hardening or case hardening) and tempering are not cast in dies.
die casting